Monday

Belize Survivor, part 36

Within a few months the preparations for the wedding were complete – food, flowers, what to wear, invitations. Friends from all over California had already promised to share in their happiness, and Alexis’ parents were flying in from Pennsylvania. Everything was in line for the big day.

On the day before the ceremony, Max and Alexis decided to head to the North Fork for a swim at a spectacular nude swimming hole called Oregon Falls. As the couple relaxed on a rock, Alexis saw a tall young man she vaguely recognized from the previous summer on the South Fork. She called out to him, and the young man squinted in the bright sunlight, smiled, and walked over to greet her with a platonic kiss on the cheek.

"Alexis, right? Sure, I remember you. Long time, no see."

"Doug, I'd like you to meet Max, my fiancé. We're getting married tomorrow."

Doug congratulated them both. Max stared at him and accepted the handshake, but said nothing.

"Have a seat," said Alexis. "Join us."

"No, really I can't," he said. "I've got some friends over there. We were just leaving."

"Well, maybe you'd like to come to the wedding tomorrow. Twelve-thirty. We'd love to have you." She told him the location, and he said he would try to attend. After exchanging a few pleasantries, Doug rejoined his friends. After a few minutes passed, Alexis realized that Max still sat in silence.

"What's wrong, Max? You’re not saying anything."

"I don't like the way you were looking at that guy. Who is he really? Some dude you were screwing back on the river last year?"

"Take it easy. He was just a friend from the cabin on the South Fork. What are you so pissed off about anyway?"

"You, that's what. You couldn't take your eyes off that big dick of his, could you?"

"He's only a friend, and I rarely, if ever, saw him with clothes on. What are you so upset about? He‘s not a former lover, but even if he was, so what? What difference does it make? You're the only one for me now."

Max continued to stare into the water in anger. "I just can't stand the thought of another man touching you."

"Well, I still have men friends. That's not going to change."

"Maybe it is, maybe it isn't."

Now Alexis reacted to the irksome statement. "What's that supposed to mean?"

"Tomorrow you're going to marry me, not somebody else," he said, his voice getting louder. "I don't expect to ever see you look at another man like that again – especially one like Mr. Long Dong back there."

"Looking at him like what? My feelings for a man are not in proportion to the length of his penis. You're just going to have to get more confidence in me, or maybe yourself. I don't mind you having opinions, or even dictating certain aspects of our relationship, as long as they're reasonable. I've probably always been a little too headstrong anyway. But you can't tell me how to live or who to be friends with. Otherwise we'd better call off this wedding and just have a big party for our friends instead."

"Yeah, well, maybe we should."

"You're overreacting! I can't believe this. We have a life planned together. We're going off to find a better place, remember? Make a home for ourselves in the tropics somewhere. You sold our cars and bought the van so we could. What about the unconditional love that Ken taught us? Don't you believe that we're supposed to be together? What happened to the theory anybody can live with anybody if they work at it hard enough? Don't we love each other? Have a little faith." She stroked his arm lovingly.

“Max?"
He sat there in stony silence for several minutes before he answered. At long last he said, "Yeah, I guess so."

Alexis didn't notice it at the time, but Max never actually admitted to being sorry. In fact, during the six months they’d been together, she realized then that she’d had never known him to apologize for anything.

Two days later Alexis lay awake in the quaint hotel room whose picture window overlooked the forested banks of the Russian River. It was late morning. She could hear

Max moving around in the bathroom. Quietly she lay on the bed, letting her mind drift back to the wedding.

It had been a splendid day in a fairy-tale setting of flowers and good friends under the cool shade of the ponderosa pines. Ken Keyes had brought the huge lumbering bus from Berkeley to officiate the ceremony. Martin and Annie had come from Santa Cruz; Mark Donovan had made the trip from Berkeley. Hank and Danny had arrived from Oakland, and David and the Yuba River people had also joined in the festivities.

Frank and Liz, Alexis’ parents had also attended; Liz enjoying the unique and unusual setting of a California hippie wedding, and Frank barely tolerating the bizarre array of long-haired attendees. And although he wouldn’t hurt Alexis by saying so, he fervently wished the groom had been someone else – anyone else.

Alexis had worn a simple white dress, and Max, an embroidered cotton tunic and pants of pale green. Danny and Hank had designed beautiful wreathes of flowers for their hair, and the couple had stood before the assembly of friends making unrehearsed declarations of love, rather than traditional vows. After the wedding, there was a celebration of music, presents, dancing, champagne, and a feast of organic dishes. The party lasted until after dusk. Eventually the crowd thinned and a large campfire was lit. For several hours, the last few happy people sat around playing guitars, staring into the flames, talking of destinies and the road ahead.

Now Alexis and Max were married. This was their honeymoon and everything should have been perfect. Yet somehow she felt a terrible void. Their recent lovemaking left her feeling detached, and a feeling of emptiness had invaded her being. Not like something was wrong, more like something was missing. A still small voice seemed to question her – is this all there is?Within a few months the preparations for the wedding were complete – food, flowers, what to wear, invitations. Friends from all over California had already promised to share in their happiness, and Alexis’ parents were flying in from Pennsylvania. Everything was in line for the big day.

(INSERT GREEN RIVER SKINNY DIPPING) On the day before the ceremony, Max and Alexis decided to head to the North Fork for a swim at a spectacular nude swimming hole called Oregon Falls. As the couple relaxed on a rock, Alexis saw a tall young man she vaguely recognized from the previous summer on the South Fork. She called out to him, and the young man squinted in the bright sunlight, smiled, and walked over to greet her with a platonic kiss on the cheek.

"Alexis, right? Sure, I remember you. Long time, no see."

"Doug, I'd like you to meet Max, my fiancé. We're getting married tomorrow."

Doug congratulated them both. Max stared at him and accepted the handshake, but said nothing.

"Have a seat," said Alexis. "Join us."

"No, really I can't," he said. "I've got some friends over there. We were just leaving."

"Well, maybe you'd like to come to the wedding tomorrow. Twelve-thirty. We'd love to have you." She told him the location, and he said he would try to attend. After exchanging a few pleasantries, Doug rejoined his friends. After a few minutes passed, Alexis realized that Max still sat in silence.

"What's wrong, Max? You’re not saying anything."

"I don't like the way you were looking at that guy. Who is he really? Some dude you were screwing back on the river last year?"

"Take it easy. He was just a friend from the cabin on the South Fork. What are you so pissed off about anyway?"

"You, that's what. You couldn't take your eyes off that big dick of his, could you?"

"He's only a friend, and I rarely, if ever, saw him with clothes on. What are you so upset about? He‘s not a former lover, but even if he was, so what? What difference does it make? You're the only one for me now."

Max continued to stare into the water in anger. "I just can't stand the thought of another man touching you."

"Well, I still have men friends. That's not going to change."

"Maybe it is, maybe it isn't."

Now Alexis reacted to the irksome statement. "What's that supposed to mean?"

"Tomorrow you're going to marry me, not somebody else," he said, his voice getting louder. "I don't expect to ever see you look at another man like that again – especially one like Mr. Long Dong back there."

"Looking at him like what? My feelings for a man are not in proportion to the length of his penis. You're just going to have to get more confidence in me, or maybe yourself. I don't mind you having opinions, or even dictating certain aspects of our relationship, as long as they're reasonable. I've probably always been a little too headstrong anyway. But you can't tell me how to live or who to be friends with. Otherwise we'd better call off this wedding and just have a big party for our friends instead."

"Yeah, well, maybe we should."

"You're overreacting! I can't believe this. We have a life planned together. We're going off to find a better place, remember? Make a home for ourselves in the tropics somewhere. You sold our cars and bought the van so we could. What about the unconditional love that Ken taught us? Don't you believe that we're supposed to be together? What happened to the theory anybody can live with anybody if they work at it hard enough? Don't we love each other? Have a little faith." She stroked his arm lovingly.

“Max?"
He sat there in stony silence for several minutes before he answered. At long last he said, "Yeah, I guess so."

Alexis didn't notice it at the time, but Max never actually admitted to being sorry. In fact, during the six months they’d been together, she realized then that she’d had never known him to apologize for anything.

Two days later Alexis lay awake in the quaint hotel room whose picture window overlooked the forested banks of the Russian River. It was late morning. She could hear

Max moving around in the bathroom. Quietly she lay on the bed, letting her mind drift back to the wedding.

(INSERT HIPPIE WEDDING) It had been a splendid day in a fairy-tale setting of flowers and good friends under the cool shade of the ponderosa pines. Ken Keyes had brought the huge lumbering bus from Berkeley to officiate the ceremony. Martin and Annie had come from Santa Cruz; Mark Donovan had made the trip from Berkeley. Hank and Danny had arrived from Oakland, and David and the Yuba River people had also joined in the festivities.

Frank and Liz, Alexis’ parents had also attended; Liz enjoying the unique and unusual setting of a California hippie wedding, and Frank barely tolerating the bizarre array of long-haired attendees. And although he wouldn’t hurt Alexis by saying so, he fervently wished the groom had been someone else – anyone else.

Alexis had worn a simple white dress, and Max, an embroidered cotton tunic and pants of pale green. Danny and Hank had designed beautiful wreathes of flowers for their hair, and the couple had stood before the assembly of friends making unrehearsed declarations of love, rather than traditional vows. After the wedding, there was a celebration of music, presents, dancing, champagne, and a feast of organic dishes. The party lasted until after dusk. Eventually the crowd thinned and a large campfire was lit. For several hours, the last few happy people sat around playing guitars, staring into the flames, talking of destinies and the road ahead.

Now Alexis and Max were married. This was their honeymoon and everything should have been perfect. Yet somehow she felt a terrible void. Their recent lovemaking left her feeling detached, and a feeling of emptiness had invaded her being. Not like something was wrong, more like something was missing. A still small voice seemed to question her – is this all there is?



Related Posts :



Sphere: Related Content

0 advocates for peace:



Pray the Devil Back to Hell

Advocates

Advocates

  © Blogger template 'Perfection' by Ourblogtemplates.com 2008

Back to TOP