Monday

Michael Hayes Wants to Build "Family-Centered" Child Support

I must continue to emphasize that the Office of Child Support Enforcement (OSCE) is no longer about collecting child support. It is about meddling in your family business and exercising government control over families (which begins with the "birth certificate" and "marriage licenses"), with emphasis on removing control from women as childbearers and autonomous beings. This money is NOT going to raise the children--it is going into million-dollar research at the hand of psychology pseudoscience and court litigation.

Well, who is Michael Hayes?

I'm glad you asked.

(emphasis mine)
Michael Hayes is the Deputy for Family Initiatives in the Child Support Division of the Texas Office of the Attorney General. His extensive experience includes the development of policy, partnerships, and projects that support family stability, paternity establishment, father involvement, and child support program improvement. Before his current post, he helped create and was director of the Texas Fragile Families Initiative, a statewide project involving community-based, faith-based, and public agencies to support fragile families.
Hopefully he is paying his child support, unlike the OCSE Director of Project Save Our Children, Nicholas Soppa.

Pay attention to his previous and current roles. This man is dipping in, out and around the kool-aid in the name of "fragile families."
The Texas Fragile Families Initiative (TFF) was an innovative state-wide demonstration project developed through the partnership of the Hogg Foundation for Mental Health and the Center for Public Policy Priorities. The Initiative was designed to facilitate the development of community-based services for young, low-income, fathers as they support the emotional, physical, and financial needs of their children.
Oh, that makes me feel so warm inside!

But what if the fathers aren't supporting the emotional, physical and financial needs of their children? Will they still help?

Cha-ching!

Fiscal YearOPDIVGrantee NameAward TitleSum of Actions
2009 ACF TX ST OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL 2007 OCSE $ 133,456
2009 ACF TX ST OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL 2008 OCSE $ 19,160,000
2009 ACF TX ST OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL 2009 OCSE $ 133,681,954
2009 ACF TX ST OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL FY 2009 STATE ACCESS & VISITATION $ 687,548

2008 ACF TX ST OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL 2008 OCSE $ 157,717,616
2008 ACF TX ST OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL 2008 SAVP $ 687,405
2008 ACF TX ST OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL OCSE RESEARCH GRANTS 1115 WAIVER $ 703,000
2008 ACF TX ST OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL OCSE SECTION 1115 (PA-3) $ 60,000
2008 ACF TX ST OFFICE OF THE ATTORNEY GENERAL SPECIAL IMPROVEMENT PROJECTS $ 25,000


In Michael Hayes' own words (emphasis mine):
The current national child support enforcement strategic plan (for 2005 – 2009) clearly describes this emphasis on both emotional and financial support and the involvement of both parents. With 4 out of 10 children in the United States born to unmarried parents, there are millions of children counting on somebody or some agency to help provide structure and support to their family; who better than us? In particular, I’m hopeful about the new Administration’s interest in continuing to support the involvement of fathers and I think the child support program has a wealth of knowledge and experience to bring to that task.
So here we have it that OCSE is involved with "emotional support." And of course, who better to run to than the U.S. government to help us get out of this epidemic of being "unmarried."

And yes, Obama is supportive of involving fathers, but how in the world can the government regulate the family and force some people to be something that they are not? NO amount of legislation is going to turn a deadbeat into Mr. Huxtable.
I also want to acknowledge the value that OCSE Section 1115 and SIP grants have had for the evolution of child support, both in Texas and around the country. Through Section 1115 grants, our Family Initiatives Section in Texas has been able to pursue the projects I’ve talked about, since these grants may be used to fund certain activities not normally allowed under FFP rules. The creativity and innovation that those grant programs have fostered play a big part in child support’s continued growth and vision. We take pride in how we’ve been able to keep the work going after the grant funding expires by using careful collaboration and coordination. For example, we found we could provide additional services to parents by linking Access and Visitation partners to our child support offices. Once the parents meet with us about the support order, they are escorted to the AV staff so they can develop a parenting plan. We could not have moved as thoughtfully or as quickly without that support.
Thank you, Michael Hayes, for making this so easy for us! I don't even have to explain it anymore.
Another great part about our work in the Family Initiatives Section is the way we use research to develop theoretical models for project development, and then take that theoretical model and design the intervention, track and evaluate implementation of the intervention, and then use what we learn to inform the next generation of programs and policy.
And so we conclude with how the Department of Health and Human Services (DHHS), Administration of Children and Families (ACF) fuels their own research and sets propaganda in action through the creation of public policy.


All quoted information courtesy of the Office of Child Support Enforcement, Child Support Report, Vol. 31, No. 1. January 2009.