Wednesday

Black People Are the Worst Child Abusers? Well, Not Really

I have heard plenty an older White feminist, and of course the menz, state that Black women participate in some of the worst forms of child abuse. Every time I hear this, I have to stop and think for a minute: Are White people serious? And what are they basing this off of?

Don't get me wrong, I've seen plenty Black folk whooping that ass and cursing their kids out, in public AND in private. But when it comes to what I've observed about White families, their kids run all over them in public, from having temper tantrums, to cursing them out, kicking and slapping. I cannot account for what happens behind closed doors. But where do the public displays of the children come from?

It is common knowledge about what Child Protective Services (CPS) does to Black families with children. Upon writing the previous sentence, I have just figured out that if White women, or White people in general, hold these beliefs [about Black women/families], it's no wonder about the CPS. Hmmmm.

This makes me feel bad that I actually almost fell for these lies. Just like Black people falling for fatherhood/fatherlessness lies.

From the 1996 Executive Summary of the Third National Incidence Study of Child Abuse and Neglect (yes, I know a bit dated, but the next one has not concluded), under contract by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services Administration for Children and Families Administration on Children, Youth and Families National Center on Child Abuse and Neglect (emphasis mine):

Race. The NIS-3 found no race differences in maltreatment incidence. The NIS-3 reiterates the findings of the earlier national incidence studies in this regard. That is, the NIS-1 and the NIS-2 also found no significant race differences in the incidence of maltreatment or maltreatment-related injuries.

Service providers may find these results somewhat surprising in view of the disproportionate representation of children of color in the child welfare population and in the clientele of other public agencies. However, it should be recognized that the NIS methodology identifies a much broader range of children than those who come to the attention of any one type of service agency or the even smaller subset who receive child protective and other child welfare services. The NIS findings suggest that the different races receive differential attention somewhere during the process of referral, investigation, and service allocation, and that the differential representation of minorities in the child welfare population does not derive from inherent differences in the rates at which they are abused or neglected. It is also important to recognize that while there are no overall race differences in the incidence of child abuse and neglect in the NIS-3 findings, subsequent analyses that simultaneously consider multiple characteristics may reveal race differences in maltreatment incidence among specific subsets of children (e.g., for children of certain ages, for one sex but not the other, etc.).


And so another racist statement, down the drain.